Corporate Greed Hits Home in Camden’s Knife

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cover49253-smallCamden’s Knife takes corporate greed to a whole new level. In the near future, The Camden-Young’s disease has spread affecting 74% of the Caucasian population. Strangely, the other 26% seems immune.  Relief lies in treatment of the symptoms from a line of drugs created by Southern United Enterprises (SUE). The drugs make them a big profit and are even used recreationally by a group called the Sixers. Dr. Arthur Camden believes he can find the cure, but after being let go by SUE his notebooks housing the cure have become property of the money hungry company. Trisha Lane, SUE’s ruthless executive wants to keep the notebooks out of Camden’s hands and keep the profit for the company high, even as those around her die.  To make matters worse, Arthur Camden’s own girlfriend has been recently diagnosed with Camden-Young’s disease. Camden must face off against an evil corporation to help humanity and save the woman he loves.

According to the prologue, Camden’s Knife by John Patrick Kavanagh is actually a rewriting of Sixers, a novel he published previously. The book has been updated and rewritten for a modern audience; replacing 1980’s musicians with Katy Perry for example.  I will admit that this book was often times a bit hard to follow. It takes for granted that the reader is intensely focused on every word, while also attempting to add an air of mystery and corporate greed. It also seems dated, even with the updated information. The concept of corporate greed is nothing new, but Camden’s Knife gives readers the shivers. In a world where we are researching methods to cure AIDS and Cancer, is it so farfetched to believe a war is existing to prevent cures and to continue treating the symptoms for profit?

John Patrick Kavanagh gives the reader a great deal to think about in Camden’s Knife. It also begs the question of how far society will go to make a dollar, even as the bodies hit the floor in droves.

Camden’s Knife is now available.

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