Mistress of Death: The Met Dresses to Kill

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Image Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Image Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

For those with a slightly more morbid taste in dresscode, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York has a new exhibit you’ll be dying to get into. Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire features the fashion of a “dying” art. Popularized by Queen Victoria, mourning attire became a test of wealth and style for widows. From full mourning to half mourning, and even to the strange

Image Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Image Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

concept of quarter mourning, widows and their children were expected to conform to a certain fashion style to show their grief for lost loved ones. The new exhibit at the Met features mourning garb from 1815 until 1915, including a dress worn by the lady who made mourning fashionable, Queen Victoria.

Per the press release issued by the Met:

“Elaborate standards of mourning set by royalty spread across class lines via fashion magazines,” said Ms. Regan, “and the prescribed clothing was readily available for purchase through mourning ‘warehouses’ that proliferated in European and American cities by mid-century.”

I’m not sure about you, but I would absolutely love to be caught dead in one of these

Image Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Image Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

dresses.

 

For those with access to the New York museum, the exhibit runs from now until February 1, 2014. Tickets and more information are available from the Metropolitan Museum of Art website.

Image Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Image Courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

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