‘Intersect #1’ is Experimental Horror in Watercolor

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intersect01_cover_web_1Flesh is the medium by which divine hands have sculpted human beings. The body has culturally been a vessel of purity, so that the idea of it bubbling, twisting, morphing, into inhuman forms is the stuff of nightmares. Ray Fawkes has made the premise of a world shifting chaotically into the grotesque, a mysterious and beautifully palatable piece of stylized art.

The city that was once Detroit is falling apart due to the broken laws of reality. Three bodies have been warped by this phenomena, and all are on the run from further death and mutilation by an unseen sadist. Jason is trapped inside the body of the woman he loves, and is afflicted by blackouts. Allison, the true host, is only able to take control of her form by eclipsing his consciousness. The lover can never communicate with his beloved, and their two souls are gripped with differing agendas: Jason wants to stay in Detroit and Allison is determined to escape it. He wants to find answers to the warped city, for it appears to be a force keeping Allison alive. She does not appear share his affection or sentiment, wanting to end her bodily distortion along side “The Kid”, a young man who is growing backwards out of his original body.

Intersect’s most distinguishing feature is the loveliness of the watercolor illustrations, creating expressive impressions of figures and forms. Its ethereal visuals contrasts brutality of the comic’s disturbing universe and the jaggedly frantic energy of its tone. Scenes overlap each other in the fluid of mixtures of a dream, as most pages are not delineated by panels. It is a disorienting experience upon the first read, and the hook of its characters’ contemplations and violence may seem intriguing but unclear. However, Fawkes’ art and story have created a well wrought experience that is creepy, enjoyable, and well worth puzzling out.

Intersect is now available from Image Comics.

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