“The Kiverson Case” Is a Fun Wild Ride

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In The Kiverson Case by Julie C. Gilbert, Ann and Patrick Duncan, now married two years after several years as law enforcement partners, take part in the arrest of the Kiverson family, where they capture the father, John, but where Emilia Kiverson, the mother manages to kill herself despite Ann’s attempt to stop her. Her three children, Ben, Angela, and Kevin, watch on a tablet from cameras in the house. Full of feelings of hatred, Kevin determines to get revenge.

Later, Ann picks up the phone at her FBI office in Washington D.C. to hear a voice on a voice changer but which she thinks belongs to a man. Then her cell phone rings with the same man. Patrick soon gets calls from the same man. And the man challenges them to five tasks, each of which will result in death to others if they don’t succeed. What is worse, the man threatens Ann and Patrick’s 8-month-old son, Joseph. They must race to complete these tasks or face serious consequences.

The Kiverson Case is not a long book, but it has a creative story. The details of the tasks prove interesting and dramatic. We feel invested in the personal safety of Ann and Patrick, as well as baby Joseph. We also connect with Ben, the youngest Kiverson brother, who has come to realize his mother was not killed by the FBI agents but instead took her own life. He has qualms about targeting the Duncans. Further, we become intrigued by Kevin, who shows real maniacal vengeance.

This book is a Christian mystery. For example, Ann and Patrick pray for protection and peace in their risky situations. They also give the Christian message of salvation to a character in ther book and pray for him to find God. It depends upon how strongly a reader cares about issues of belief as to how much that person will be bothered by this.

Kristin Condon performs the audio version of this book. With her gentle voice, she seems an unusual choice to narrate a book like this. Usually they are performed by a more dynamic narrator.
But she succeeds in making the book enjoyable. I did not like the sound effects in this book though. Each chapter begins with a short musical selection that feels uncomfortable. Further, the phone calls with the voice changer seem strange in their sound effects, but what is worse, they garble the sound so that I had a hard time understanding the speech.

I really liked The Kiverson Case and enjoyed listening to it. For such as relatively short book, it packs plenty of exciting material and good character development. I give this book five stars.

Disclaimer: I received this book for free from the author, but that in no way had any effect on the content of my review.

To purchase this book for yourself, click here on Amazon.

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